Separation of Church and State

Critics of those of us committed to the Christian cultural mandate (our Christian critics included) often declare that we deny the separation of church and state. This charge is false, though usually not in the sense intended. We do not deny the separation of church and state as institutions. Each has its separate, unique calling. This is what sphere sovereignty is all about. The state is not to do the job of the church, just the church is not to do the job of the state. We’ve had examples of both historically, and they’ve been disastrous.

But while there should be a separation of church and state, there should never be a separation of the state from God. And in fact, there will never be a separation of the state from a deity of some kind. Every state, including the most atheistic state, serves some god.

The goal of biblical Christianity is to influence every area of the world by the gospel of Jesus Christ for God’s kingdom empowered by the Holy Spirit.

This includes the state. This does not mean that we wish to capture the state to impose Christianity. “Imposing” Christianity, if we can even use that language, is the job of the family and church. The Christian job of the state is to guarantee liberty for all individuals, businesses, families, and churches within the broad parameters of God’s law. This basically reduces to suppressing crimes like murder, theft, rape, fraud, kidnapping and so forth.

The goal of the state is not to make people virtuous. Rather, it is to prevent people from being as externally vicious as they might otherwise be.

This is a summary of the redemptivist view of the separation of church and state.